• Neoplastic Vascular Disease

    by  • 09/09/2013 • Cardiology

    Benign tumours and related conditions

    Hemangioma (=benign, children, strawberry lesion on face/scalp/CNS/liver/mucous membranes, can result of trauma [granuloma pyogenicum]).

    1. Common
    2. Especially in children.
    3. Make up approximately 7% of all benign tumours.

     

    Capillary hemangioma

    1. o Occur mostly in skin and mucous membranes
    2. o Well-defined, encapsulated aggregates of capillaries
    3. o May be thrombosed

     

    Juvenile capillary (strawberry) hemangioma

    1. o Present at birth on the face and scalp
    2. o Grow rapidly for the first few months, then regress and disappear by the age of 5

     

    Cavernous hemangioma

    1. o Large, cavernous, vascular channels that are not encapsulated
    2. o Involve skin, mucous membranes, the central nervous system and the liver

     

    Granuloma pyogenicum

    1. o Ulcerated version of capillary hemangioma
    2. o Caused by trauma
    3. o Composed of capillaries with oedema, inflammatory cells and granulation tissue
    4. Glomangioma
      1. Painful tumours of the glomus body = receptor in the smooth muscle of arteries that is sensitive to temperature
      2. Usually found in fingers or nail beds.

       

      Hemangioendothelioma: Intermediate-grade tumours

      1. Neoplasms that show both benign and malignant characteristics.
      2. Consist of vascular channels with masses of spindle-shaped plump cells of endothelial origin

       

      Angiosarcoma: Malignant tumours

      1. Rare but very aggressive
      2. Found in skin, breasts, liver and spleen
      3. Especially in elderly.
      4. There are small, red nodules that changes into large white masses in which cells of all differentiations are found.

       

      Hemangiopericytoma

      1. Malignant tumour of pericytes occurring in the lower extremities or in the retroperitoneum.
      2. About half of these metastasise.

       

      Kaposis sarcoma

      1. Malignant tumour of unknown origin.
      2. Purple plaques are found in skin, mucosa or viscera.
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